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20121027
20121104
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Search Results 0 to 41 of about 42 (some duplicates have been removed)
health and if you are chronically suffering from challenges in the environment or from wherever source, you are going to be not paying a lot of attention to things that are very far away, but how do ye exist, how do i deal with this problem, how do my children and my family deal with these issues and as you are well aware, there are still lots of problems in the world. the good news is there's been a tremendous amount of progress, scientific knowledge that many of you in this room have been major contributors to that. and we have made great strides, and it seems to me that one of the things that ought to motivate us today is to figure out how to leverage the advances in science and medicine directly benefit every person in this world that has a need that can be satisfied, salt, resolved or ameliorated by these advancements, and that's a task that we have in front of us. and why i am interested in being here, why i am participating in this and why there is still a lot of work to be done. now that you are all here no one signs the room without signing a pledge to donate a significant amo
environment still? > > i don't believe so. long- term bonds, most of the gains that we have seen in there have been capital gains. we have to understand that when interest rates fall - and we're talking long-term interest rates - fall, long-term bonds will rise in value. but the opposite will also occur. so we're in an environment where long-term interest rates are, if they're not at record lows as we speak, they're pretty close to record lows, and you have central banks around the world - in the u.s. as well as other places - trying to reflate, trying to cause growth to happen. and when growth arises, interest rates rise. so you're betting against some of the most powerful central banks in the world by buying long-term bonds. > > what are you recommending to clients? > > if the client wishes to stay with bonds, then you move to the shorter end, that is the one-to-five-year area. they still could be affected to some degree if interest rates rise. and again, this would be long- term interest rates rising. but they certainly wouldn't be hurt as much as long-term bonds. there was a study i saw re
. small businesses are taxed at 35%. that is not sustainable in this environment today. we have to change the loopholes at the top. big companies like ge and others pay no taxes and small companies pay up to 35%. we need to make it fair to everybody. first and foremost, we have to create an environment that our small businesses can thrive. when we look at the uniqueness on the border that is different and the tax reform or the nation, we need immigration reform. as i travel the border and i meet with agricultural people, we have a work force problem because the immigration system and the visa system is broken. these problems trade an impediment to congress. we have to be able to provide a work force but can move back and forth easily. we are not able to do that because of the impediments that are there by not having an effective comprehensive immigration policy. that becomes an economic issue as well. the workers here who want to work, there is not enough of them. the workers who come across the border to take care of the ranches and agricultural industry, they can i get back and forth li
, rigorous practices hp ensure our operations are safe and clean for our communities and the environment. we're america's natural gas. ♪ [ engine revs ] ♪ [ male announcer ] oh what fun it is to ride. get the mercedes-benz on your wish list at the winter event going onow -- but hurry, the offer ends soon. dagen: we have a triple digit rally on our hands. we are getting to that time every hour because every 15 minutes it is stocks now. we are close enough, nicole petallides. nicole: i ain't going, no, no. you have ford down 1.5%. we have gotten a lot of news on ford, as well. they did name the chief operating officer. they said it is too early to predict the impact of sandy on the november u.s. auto sales. we do not want to speculate too much on that. we continue to have all of arrows across the board. the majority of the dow jones industrials seem to be doing good. microsoft, caterpillar, disney, jpmorgan, all doing well. apple and facebook coming back after selling off yesterday. so far, so good. continuing to talk about how difficult it is to be here and how they got here and how they
to the environment with fossil fuel burnage and all the other ways that we're throwing off kilter that energy balance it makes sense that there would be a corresponding rice in hurricanes. >> cenk: i love that explanation. it's not just random. the climate deniers, i don't know, it's random. it's not random. it's based on the events that mark explained. kara, it seems we have a combination of two or three storms here producing the super storm. is that also something that might be related to climate change? >> it's funny that you mention that and call it a super storm a.p. called it a franken storm and cnn banned the use of the term saying that that word frankenstorm which we know because it's multiple storms coming together, they said it kind of implied this was a man made disaster and wanted to be careful about attribution. that's a point we are not discussing is attribution is very, very difficult when it comes to an individual storm to say oh this is caused by climate change. it's like connecting a to z because there are so many variables in between. what we do know is that the general atmosphere
gas producers to supply affordable, cleaner energy, while protecting our environment. acro america, these technologies protect air - by monitoring air quality and reducing emissions... ...protect water - through conservation and self-contained recycling systems... ... and protect land - by reducing our footprint and respecting wildlife. america's natural gas... domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... that's smarter power today. domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... you know it can be hard to lbreathe, and how that feels.e, copd includes chronic bronchitis and emphysema. spiriva helps control my copd symptoms by keeping my airways open for 24 hours. plus, it reduces copd flare-ups. spiriva is the only once-daily inhaled copd maintenance treatment that does both. spiriva handihaler tiotropium bromide inhalation powder does not replace fast-acting inhalers for sudden symptoms. tell your doctor if you have kidney problems, glaucoma, trouble urinating, or an enlarged prostate. these may worsen with spiriva. discuss all medicines you take, even eye drops.
to understand too with the scope of this storm every location has to deal with the environment in which they are facing. every location is going to be different than every other location. we have to face unique circumstances and manage that process as best we can. i am absolutely confident that the leadership and the folks and boots on the ground at con ed are doing everything they can do to get the power back on as safely and as expeditiously as possible. >> you mentioned unusual nature of these storms. it seems as though we have unusual storms a lot more frequently than we used to. you run one of the largest power companies in the country, is it your thought that talks of climate change will come to the fore and lead to discussions about your business? >> the point is right now we are not dedicated to getting into an argument. we have to get the power back on. that's our business at this point. we're going to get that done as fast and safely as possible. >> tom, thank you so much for coming on. of course on behalf of everybody in the northeast, thanks for the help you're providing tod
of replicating the floor environment trying to figure out where to move people to, we opt to do it electronically for a day or two doesn't make a statement or change my view about how we feel about the floor. you know how i feel about it. it's an important point of the model. in an emergency situation, do you what you need to do to keep the markets open. in terms of that, there is no doubt it could handle volume. until you test it in production, you're not going to know. so that was going to be the first production test to see and our guess is it would have gone fine. who knows. you also would not have been likely to see the volume and volatility you would have seen as a lot of people simply weren't going to participate today if we had tried to open as an industry. >> have you started to give thought -- one thing about flooding, you never really know what the extent of the damage is going to be. what if we go into wednesday? what if people start missing out on their last chances to unload options? >> we are thinking that far ahead as an industry and although we can't predict the weather, carl, i
. and the william and flora hewlett foundation, working t solve soci and environment problems at homand oundhe world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... friends of the newshour. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: hurricane sandy beg battering its way ashore today, threatening days of destruction. the huge system had 50 million people in its sights and was already being called a superstorm. the winds grew stronger by the hour. and the rain poured harder, soaking the east coast as the hurricane closed in. nine states declared emergencies, and people up and down the coast braced for heavy flooding, wind damage, and resulting power outages. >> i just got another load of sandbags to put around the doors to keep the water out. got the generator ready to go. and we're going to sit there and ride it out. no place else to go. >> i am worried. there's a reason to be worried. but we're going to hope for the best. that's all. you know what? i
cleanup goes, if obama makes a mistake later on. usually in the short run, crisis environment tends to help the incumbent president. and we only have the short run now. if there is fallout it might occur after he were re-elected. i think voters are basing this on the economy. maybe you have 1% of voters out there, undecided. an interesting event. but if romney had it in the cards to win before i'm not sure it would shift things enough against him. >> i guess it still comes down to swing states and in many of those, what may be more important for both candidates, the inability to get to both places like ohio in the last few days. >> sure, romney spending time in ohio, and that's where this election comes down to. obama up by 2, 2 1/2, 3 points. in history, candidates overcome leads like that, it's pretty hard. a small lead, when you have so few undecided voters left, thard of the state already voted and turned out, it's challenging and that's romney's biggest hurdle, entirely ohio. >> have you been described as a potential one-term celebrity pollster. how did you react? you are a bit
hundreds of thousands of people live very close to each other. this sort of city environment only allows people to live that close to one another because of the intensively-used infrastructure. it's infrastructure that allows this place to support this much life. that allows us to cram this many humans into this small a space. and here's what some of that infrastructure looks like tonight. you're looking at a new york city subway station. which now looks like a dirty aquarium. the subway system is the veins underneath this city that provide life. they are the special infrastructure that allows the city to separate. for the rich, the poor, and everybody in between. right now, it's swamped. you can't even get down on to the subway platforms because the water is everywhere. the army corps of engineers has been called in by officials to help drain these subway tunnels. a task that the army corps has never had to do before. the manhattan burro president is calling this the biggest disaster in the 108-year history of this subway system. before this, the only place they had ever operated was in
was expecting. >> well, phil, i'd say overall it was a good quarter for us. and a challenging environment. being able to grow revenue, grow profits as you mentioned year-over-year. our margins are up slightly, strong cash flow. got some important launches away this quarter in terms of new vehicles into the market for cadillac and other of our brands. so good quarter overall, and we've made some progress on some of the tough issues in front of us including pensions and we're making reasonable progress in europe. >> and we'll talk about europe in a bit. but i want to ask you about revenue. nearly $2 billion better than expected coming in at $37.6 billion, how much of that was volume? how much of that was pricing? >> it really split between the two. and i'd point out also there's over a billion dollars of negative impact from foreign exchange in there. so backing that out, the revenue growth's even stronger than initially appears. and really, that's about the vehicles we're bringing into the marketplace and how well they're getting received. obviously we need to lead with product, put the right pro
politics, environment, national security. in endorsing obama today, mayor bloomberg mentioned climate change. and as i said to the governor, it's already new amsterdam. could the city be the new new amsterdam? >> i think it's important to start thinking about infrastructure as essential national security. for the last ten years plus, the united states has had a main national security priority, the thing we've spent the most money on, a trillion-plus dollars, that's been bringing democracy to iraq and afghanistan, with very questionable results. people i've spoken to, experts in the field say, we would be a lot safer, not just richer, if he had spent a lot of that money on improving infrastructure. that is not to say that counterterrorism isn't important. it certainly is. but they're related because the stronger your society is, the more protected you are also from a terrorist attack. >> may have to keep you around to cover this for a while. richard engel, thanks. good to see you. this disaster has been a great equalizer. if you're living in a place where the water rises, the power goe
. liz: yeah. >> and we're well down the road and very, very comfortable with the environment that we're going to launch into. liz: we should mention that hewlett-packard ships one million printers a week. that is the number i wanted to get out of there first of all, because people say, oh the printer business is slouching. it may be but you're still doing pretty decent business. you have the two new products, office jet pro and laser jet. what is different about them now? >> you're exactly right. we ship actually two printers every second. so while some of our competitors are clearly, clearly struggling we are very, very focused how we continue to grow the market. we look at page growth by 2015. the world will print 6.2 trillion pages that is a 2% annual growth. when we look at both new laser jet and the new ink products that we have, very, very significant changes it our products and to our business model. our ink in the office model is the same quality as laser printing at lower prices, lower prices for, for ink. and the office, and the, and, the new, the new laser products are rea
operations are safe and clean for our communities and the environment. we're america's natural gas. >>> the predictions of new jersey would bear the brunt of sandy turned out to be very, very accurate. national guard video shows what sandy did to ocean frond property in seaside heights. that's one of the jersey shore towns badly damaged by sandy. joining me on the phone from long branch, new jersey, congressman frank pallone. you represent the 6th district, asbury park, atlantic, highland. i was in asbury last night, i left there early this morning, a lot of damage along the coast. explain to me what some of your constituents are dealing with today. >> a lot of the constituents are just going back to their homes and realizing they're totally destroyed. i was in union beach, along the route, in sandy hook bay, and the first four blocks on the bay, the waves came in and basically either carried the homes away or battered them to a pulp. and so they don't have a place to come back to. and the concern i have is all the power lines and gas lines that are broken. and you have to be so ca
that help serve the new york city and its environment when it comes to gathering and storing refined products like gas leoline of coe for our cars and jet fuel that we need for the city and it's environment. we're at newstar and more than a dozen of its siblings has not reopened, they're assessing the damage, getting the water out, getting power. when that happens remains unclear. the idle terminals are creating a choke hold on gas and jet supplies from new york to the new jersey area. we face long fuel lines in the area and often gas stations running out of supplies. prices $4 to $4.50, due in part to the damaged terminals and it's unclear when they'll come back online on an airline industry call yesterday gauging the terminal's health was the top priority given so many flights have been cancels. those are a key piece of the puzzle, at least they're coming online in partial capacity but the issues with the terminals and also restrictions on ship travel up and down the east coast are creating further crimp and it's not clear when it will be resolved. >> kate kelly thank you. do you h
in detroit, the soul of the school, andrews has created a loving environment not just for her students but also for their babies. >> last year she was in the infant room, now she's in the junior toddler room. everything they teach the kids in there is great. >> one of four high schools in the u.s. designated exclusively for high school mothers. with 220 students, the academy, which caters to pregnant teens and teen moms wasn't always like this. 26 years ago, principal andrews housed babies in a crib in her office. >> it was a little program that was hidden, nobody knew about it. >> reporter: as the demand increased, andrews saw the importance of creating an environment supportive of teen moms, but also gave their babies a head start. >> what do the moms get coming to this school they wouldn't get in another school? >> they get a staff that is focused on them. that is not mad about them being pregnant or parenting, who celebrate the fact that even though they're pregnant and parenting, they're still in school and they're participating in making a life for themselves, giving themselves s
and the environment. we're america's natural gas. to volunteer to help those in need. when a twinge of back pain surprises him. morning starts in high spirits, but there's a growing pain in his lower back. as lines grow longer, his pain continues to linger. but after a long day of helping others, he gets some helpful advice. just two aleve have the strength to keep back pain away all day. today, jason chose aleve. just two pills for all day pain relief. try aleve d for strong, all day long sinus and headache relief. soothes you to sleep with ingredients like melatonin. it's safe with no side effects, so you wake up... ready to go. [ male announcer ] unisom natural nights. >>> mike, give us a sense of what the flooding is like, and clarify, if you will, because there were some reports about the boardwalk being impacted. >> there are reports -- now, i vbt been able to get close to the boardwalk, but the boardwalk partially collapsed here in atlantic city, and i have a special guest that's going to hopefully clear few that as well. just to give you an idea. in front of me say consinges have center.
allow natural gas producers to supply affordable, cleaner energy, while protecting our environment. across america, these technologies protect air - by monitoring air quality and reducing emissions... ...protect water - through conservation and self-contained recycling systems... ... and protect land - by reducing our footprint and respecting wildlife. america's natural gas... domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... that's smarter power today. >>> another ireport -- actually, we're going to start with this story. the can't of a submerged ship still missing. . .ms bounty was trying to plea sandy when it began taking on water off the coast of north carolina. the crew abandoned ship and the coast guard was called in to save the crew. >> were you nervous going in there? >> i was. i hadn't seen anything like this before. this was the first case that i had been into a hurricane. >> the waves were just sort of tossing it this way and that way. 50 knot winds. visibility was still pretty poor. >> he was really happy to see us, that's for sure. >> survivors coming up. >> 14 cr
governor christie is now saying about the federal response, in this environment we can really see how much fema is needed. >> you're absolutely right. fema is needed. you're also right that there's a distinction between benghazi. the difference is fema's role is derivative. the governor calls fema in. they don't have any independent authority to go into new jersey or new york. in benghazi, there's only one person with the ability to lead us, and that was the president of the united states. now the president is reacting to requests from governors. and he's leading and doing the right thing. then when he was the sole person at the desk, making the decisions, he flies to las vegas. and i think that is outrageous. >> we have got to get to commercial break. this is an interesting discussion. >> want to talk more? >> we'll talk more about fema as well. a lot of reporters have shouted questions to mitt romney. he hasn't said -- i think 14 times or so he has been asked and he's domged the question. i want to know if that will be problematic for him. we'll talk with bob menendez, who was touring ho
that what we are doing as people to the environment is changing the way our climate impacts us. and we're going to have to take this very seriously. and that's why it's important that government acts responsibly to regulate environmental issues. >> richard socarides, will cain. thanks for coming in this morning. >> still ahead, the travel chaos caused by sandy. so much of it, one major new york airport still under water. >> can you believe it? look at that. >> cnn's richard quest will have all of that information for us and what you can look for today. >> and when will it reopen, right? >> will it reopen? you're watching "early start." r. double miles you can actually use... but mr. single miles can't join his friends because he's getting hit with blackouts. shame on you. now he's stuck in a miniature nightmare. oh, thank you. but, with the capital one venture card... you can fly any airline, any flight, any time. double miles you can actually use. what's in your wallet? alec jr? it was a gift. ♪ [ multiple sounds making melodic tune ] ♪ [ male announcer ] at northrop grumman, ever
getting into an environment where it favored strengthening. that's what we've seen. here it is in the satellite picture. 85-mile-an-hour winds. that's a moderate strength category one storm with possible strengthening as we go through time. about 380 miles south of new york city it's movement has picked up northerly about 15 miles an hour and we still expect that turn toward the west later on. this is huge. reading some technical stuff, the tropical storm force winds, diameter nearly 800 miles wide. that is huge. the second largest tropical system we've seen in the last few decades. hurricane force winds extend 150 miles out. the amount of damaging winds is about 350 to 400 miles wide. so, that's wind of over 55 miles an hour. that is a huge swath of real estate that will be impacted by damaging winds when this thing makes its way onshore. here's the latest forecast track from the national hurricane center. hopefully our graphics are updated here. it hasn't changed a whole lot. the only thing that's changed is it may come on as slightly stronger hurricane or post-tropical
about 80 homes being lost to fire, describes it as almost a forest fire-like environment given the winds last night. so we'll talk more about that, and if he brings any more headlines we'll get them straight to you. >> you know, one thing, i think 9/11, there's no -- there's no good news about 9/11 obviously when it happened, but it seems to have brought these first responders together in a way, the coordination bond seems amazing to me, amazing. >> some of the early calls, getting the subway trains off the tracks, as the mayor said, in retrospect looks pretty smart. >> what a plan. >> let's get to lower manhattan, experiencing some record flooding yesterday. our scott cohn is live in battery park city. scott, what's the scene this morning? >> reporter: yeah, and i will second that, carl, what jim just said about how this city was prepared for it, and we talked last night how about in a lot of ways the city seemed fragile, but, you know, the evacuation zones that went into place and irene was the first time that they started to use them and then now sandy, and -- and the flooding actuall
and the environment. we're america's natural gas. >>> white house picture that's been just released. the president of the united states, the governor of new jersey on marine one, the helicopter, touring some of the devastating area in new jersey. he warmly praised governor christie for making sure everyone was safe. governor chris tee said that the president has been incredibly, incredibly diligent in what he's been doing helping everybody in new jersey. they have a great working relationship, and he can't thank the president enough for what he has done. earlier, we spoke with a congressman whose home is among the 110 homes that burned to the ground in the new york citys burough of queens. >> we caught up with him as well as some of the residents hoping to find anything left of their belongings. >> reporter: they searched through the ashes and found a few things. >> i found the cross from my rosery. >> katie raised five kids and grand kids, and she found nothing. >> i found nothing. my husband died a few years ago, his disk, and everything -- just all gone. >> as families searched for belongings,
create this kind of an environment then the child's memory is impacted with this and it makes them less cared going forward. >> gayle brings up a good point once the storm is past that's the scary part. that's where the wind and rain makes the house creak. if you're trapped indoors and have no power that's something else the kids need to under. >> let your kids know you'll be there for them. we're all together. this is a special time, something we'll always remember. you'll tell your kids about it. make it fun. >> call the neighbors. make it a community effort. >> actually if you go out anticipate help in the community afterwards with the clean up that also gives kids a wonderful feeling of having power, having ability to help and everybody feels good. that's a wonderful thing to do. >> gayle you said earlier families retook this as a family and sometimes parents don't understand the stress that even they are feeling. >> yes. >> so they are worried about their kids but they don't stop to take care of their own anxiety. >> like the airplane put our own oxygen mask on first. that's so imp
, this is the thing like even in an office environment are it is good to get distract and do something. >> how about doing your job? >> your boss is gonna love this. there is an idea, a concept. hurry up, got to go >> this is a really fun one, it has a spa-like effect, make your own liminary, balloons filled with water. you dip it into a pot of hot wax over time. look what you get. >> that's cool. really cool. finally, something that saves the segment. good. >> thank you, danny. >> we love him. he's a sweetheart. congratulations on your tenth book, buddy. hope your house is okay when you get home, too. sarah >>> time for sara in the city, this time, a spirited trip downtown. >> hundreds of year, rumored sightings of ghosts around new york city. we wanted to see for ourself, so we sent sara. >> lucky me. that's right. from a haunted house to a wine cellular full of spirits, there's a laundry list of spots in this city said to be inhabited by another force and i got to check some of them out. meet my haunted tour guide, dr. phil. no, not that dr. phil. >> i'm dr. phil. i'm not a ghost. but i'm an expe
Search Results 0 to 41 of about 42 (some duplicates have been removed)